1. A botched system of capital punishment

    NORTHAMPTON — This past Tuesday, 10 minutes after the sedative midazolam began dripping into convicted murderer Clayton Lockett’s veins, executioners at the Oklahoma State Prison pronounced him unconscious. The time had come, a prison administrator directed, to inject the other death drugs into IV tubes that had been inserted into Lockett’s veins.

    But three minutes later Lockett, who remained strapped to a gurney in the death chamber, was trying to lift his head as he clenched his teeth, convulsed, gasped for air and writhed in pain. He obviously was not unconscious at all.

    Read More of A botched system of capital punishment
  2. Helping veterans for whom the wars are not over

    Read More of Helping veterans for whom the wars are not over
  3. Words that inspired generations of activists

    In August 1955, when Pete Seeger was hauled before the House Un-American Activities Committee, congressmen demanded that he name names. Did he know any Communists, Communist-sympathizers or fellow travelers?

    Many who were subpoenaed by HUAC invoked their Fifth Amendment right to not testify. Given that just two years earlier Julius and Ethel Rosenberg had been executed, essentially for being Communists, invoking the privilege against self-incrimination seemed like sensible self-preservation. But Seeger didn’t claim a Fifth Amendment privilege.

    Read More of Words that inspired generations of activists